Travel Report March 2012

Our students in Sierra Leone have made very good progress:

"One of the ways that they learn is by translating for us during our clinic. They even start asking on their own about the “modalities” and “generalities” when we are doing the anamnesis and are coming up with very good ideas as to the appropriate remedies. During class at the Polytechnic Institute in the morning our students also ask comprehension questions that are informed and critical. We are very pleased with this. We are working on cases using the “Repertory” and “materia medica”."

 

Travel Report March 2012 by

Heidi Bart and Barbara Böttcher

Children are waving at us and laughing. They are welcoming us happily, calling out “Opodo, Opodo!” when we drive into the little village of Worreh Yeamah every afternoon in our red car. “Opodo” is Temne and means “white person”.

Our clinic room has already been prepared with loving care, using what is available locally: one wooden table with a colorful tablecloth, chairs for the patients, the translator and the person doing the treatment, a bucket of water from the well and a bar of soap.

We are sitting underneath the palm leaf canopy of one of the houses and are grateful for every little breeze that brings some relief from the heat – temperatures are reaching well over 30 degrees Celsius every day. Numerous patients are patiently waiting for us on benches in front of the house. The teacher of the village school has the patient list and is acting as receptionist. We are presented with a wide variety of clinical pictures: anemic children, illnesses as a result of the war or of accidents, joint trouble, several cases of stomach ulcers, hernias, helminthiasis, elephantiasis, various kinds of fever and much more.

We can see very good progress in our students. One of the ways that they learn is by translating for us during our clinic. They even start asking on their own about the “modalities” and “generalities” when we are doing the anamnesis and are coming up with very good ideas as to the appropriate remedies.

During class at the Polytechnic Institute in the morning our students also ask comprehension questions that are informed and critical. We are very pleased with this. We are working on cases using the “Repertory” and “materia medica”. “Kent's Repertory” still presents a big challenge for the students and using it will certainly take some more practice. We are also dealing with the subjects of pregnancy, birth and bites, and we introduce new remedies and teach some theoretical fundamentals.

The final test on the penultimate day shows that our students have become accustomed to the homeopathic way of thinking. They have made very good progress despite the adverse conditions they are sometimes faced with in order to attend the classes.

One of our students, Alimatu, tells us: “I would love to become a good homeopath so that I do not always have to give the patients injections.” To achieve this goal, she travels from the country's capital Freetown to Makeni and does not earn any money for 2 weeks. Abdul comes to our class immediately after having finished his night shift. Mohamed teaches English during this time so that he can make up for his loss of earnings. Josephine is working on her ward where we see her after visiting the hospital following our class. Dr. Wilson, the hospital's head physician, also makes time each morning to attend our class.

We can feel their enthusiasm for homeopathy and are very happy about it.

 Without the support of our cooperation partner EAFA our work would not be as succesful. Mr. John, our driver, safely took us wherever we needed to go. Mr. Mansaray has once again done an excellent job with the preparation and organization. He is always friendly, on time and reliable and worried about our well-being.

Thank you so much for the fantastic collaboration!

 

 

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